Brewing Methods: Toddy Cold Brew Coffee Maker

toddy-cold-brew-coffee-maker-commercial-and-home-toddy

The Toddy is the ultimate coffee maker. In 1964, as a chemical engineering graduate of Cornell, Todd Simpson developed and patented a cold brew system that, using regular Arabica coffee beans, creates a superior-tasting cup of steaming HOT coffee. And, with 67% LESS ACID than coffee made by conventional hot brew methods, it’s easier on sensitive stomachs. The Toddy brewer produces a low acid, coffee concentrate. Just add water for a distinctively bold, super smooth taste that has delighted connoisseurs for some 40 years. And, refrigerated, there’s no waste … Toddy can be made one cup at a time.

Now to the good stuff … how to use one!

Coffee-to-Water Ratio:

The Toddy brewing container is designed to hold (1) one pound of coffee and (9) nine cups (72 fluid ounces) of water. (If your coffee is packaged in sizes larger or smaller than one pound, click here for detailed proportion suggestions.)

Directions for the Toddy Cold Brew Coffee Maker:

1. Add (1) one cup of water into the bottom of the Toddy brewing container. Then, add (1/2) half-pound coarsely ground coffee. When pouring the water over the grounds, the water should be added gently, in a circular motion, to make sure all the grounds get wet and there are no dry pockets. Slowly pour (4) four cups of water over the grounds, then add the remaining (1/2) half pound coarsely ground coffee. Slowly pour (3) three additional cups of water over the grounds. Finally, wait five minutes and slowly add (1) one cup of water. DO NOT STIR. Lightly tap the topmost grounds with the back of a spoon to ensure all grounds get wet.
2. BREW – We recommend that you cold-brew your coffee grounds 12 hours to achieve maximum results. Remove the stopper and let coffee concentrate flow into the glass decanter. Toddy’s cold-brew process should yield (6) six cups (48 fluid ounces) of coffee concentrate. The coffee beans absorb the balance of the water. You may cold-brew your grounds longer than the recommended 12 hours. However, if you do, more acidity and caffeine will be absorbed into the liquid (although the amount of acidity and caffeine will never be as much as coffee brewed by conventional hot water methods). The trade-off: Richer concentrate will be produced (with the same amount of liquid), therefore allowing you to produce more cups of coffee per pound of coffee beans.
3.SERVE – The Toddy produces a naturally low acid, bold yet smooth coffee concentrate that may be refrigerated for up to 14 days without any deterioration in taste or freshness. And, importantly, there’s no waste. Toddy can be made one cup at a time simply by adding steaming hot or cold water, milk or cream. It’s also microwavable (do not boil concentrate). We recommend a ratio of (1) one part coffee concentrate to (3) three parts water, milk or cream. However, one of the benefits of using the Toddy system is that you can mix to taste (make it as strong or as weak as you prefer). And, you drink the coffee you make (unlike hot brewed coffee, where an average of 3-4 cups are consumed for every 8-10 produced).

NOTES: Different coffee brewing methods require different types of grinds. It’s important that you use a universal or, better yet, coarsely ground coffee with your Toddy. If you grind your beans at home, you may use an inexpensive blade grinder, grinding your beans between 9-11 seconds – similar to the grind used in an old-fashioned percolator.

Brewing Method Pros

  • 67% less acidity compared to hot brewed coffee
  • 2 week shelf life when refrigerated
  • Can be served Hot or Iced
  • User controlled brew time
  • User controlled strength when used as a concentrate
  • No build up of rancid coffee oils (when cleaned after each use)
  • Eco-friendly, simple clean up

Brewing Method Cons

  • Takes a long time to brew (12 to 18 hours)
  • Uses a lot of coffee per brew
  • Filter must be changed about every 10 brews to avoid bitter/sour taste
  • Clean up can get pretty messy

Brewing Method Suggested Coffees

  • Brazil
  • Mexico
  • Ethiopia
  • Sumatra

Brewing Methods: French Press Coffee Maker

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The first Coffee Press, which may have been made in France, was a metal or cheesecloth screen fitted to a rod that users would press into a pot of boiling water. The first patent for a Coffee Press was given to a Milanese designer Attilio Calimani in 1929. Faliero Bondanini made several design modifications, patented his own version in 1958 and began manufacturing it in a French clarinet factory called Martin S.A. This brewing method was further popularized across Europe by the name of and most notably, the Danish tableware and kitchenware company, Bodum.

The modern French Press is usually made of glass or clear plastic forming narrow cylindrical beaker, with a metal or plastic lid and plunger that fits tightly in the cylinder and has a fine metal-wire or nylon-mesh filter. The simplicity of the mechanism and its attractive presentation have led to a variety of aesthetic designs.

Now to the good stuff … how to use one!

Coffee-to-Water Ratio:

16:1 SCAA Standard = approximately 1oz (28g) coffee per 16oz (453g) water.

1.6 – 2.0 grams of coffee per fluid ounce of water; if you don’t have a scale, use 2 table spoons of coffee per 6 fluid ounces of water.

Directions for the French Press Coffee Maker:

  1. Start water boiling, then allow to cool during the next steps.
  2. Weigh proper coffee amount for size of finished cup. 
  3. Pre-heat the press with some of your hot water, then dispose of the pre-heat water.
  4. Grind the pre-weighed coffee and add it to the press (a coarser grind than drip, but not as coarse as percolator is best).
  5. Pour the cooled water (optimal 200 degrees) in a circular motion to completely saturate the grounds, filling the press to about 1 inch from the top.
  6. Give the grounds a few good stirs and allow the coffee to bloom for about 30-40 seconds.
  7. Put the plunger on and press down until the grounds are fully submerged, but still at the top of the press.
  8. After the optimal steeping time is reached, then steadily and evenly plunge the grounds to the bottom of the press.
  9. Decant the coffee into your favorite mug or thermos (to keep it hot) and enjoy.
  10. Fully disassemble the plunger apparatus and thoroughly clean all parts and the press to eliminate rancid oils in your next brew.

For greater consistency, use a weight scale and stop pouring the water at the recommended weight for the size of your finished cup.

The whole brew time from bloom to finish should take approximately 3.5-4 minutes when done correctly.

Since there aren’t any paper filters to hold back the coffee oils, you get a stronger, richer, more full-bodied cup.

Here’s a great video of the “Reverse technique” used by coffee geek Christopher Hildebrand

Brewing Method Pros

  • User temperature control
  • No paper filters to buy, re-buy, or need to dispose
  • User controlled brew time
  • No build up of rancid coffee oils (when cleaned after each use)
  • Eco-friendly, simple clean up
  • Fuller flavor since all the coffee’s oils pass into the cup

Brewing Method Cons

  • More coffee sediments get passed into your cup
  • Glass vessel will lose heat quickly (within 10 minutes +/-)
  • Even though the grounds are plunged, they will continue to extract in the vessel
  • Clean up can get pretty messy

Brewing Method Suggested Coffees

  • Brazil
  • Mexico
  • Sumatra

Brewing Methods: Hario V60 Coffee Dripper

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The Hario V60 Coffee Dripper is one of the most popular manual brewers in the specialty coffee field today, found in many brew bars around the country. The design of this pour-over has ridges along it’s innards and a single large hole at the bottom which allows the coffee to extract evenly from the vessel. Part of insuring that you get an excellent brew from the V60 is the pour technique, you must slowly and steadily coax the extraction of the brew from the grounds. V60 filters are known for being thinner than other pour-over filters which makes them contribute little paper taste to the final brew … but you should, as always, pre-rinse your paper filters to minimize the inevitable paper taste.

Now to the good stuff … how to use one!

Coffee-to-Water Ratio:

16:1 SCAA Standard = approximately 1oz (28g) coffee per 16oz (453g) water.

1.6 – 2.0 grams of coffee per fluid ounce of water; if you don’t have a scale, use 2 table spoons of coffee per 6 fluid ounces of water.

Directions for the Hario V60 Coffee Maker:

  1. Start water boiling, then allow to cool during the next steps.
  2. Weigh proper coffee amount for size of finished cup.
  3. Place paper filter into the V60.
  4. Pre-rinse the paper filter with some of your hot water to avoid a papery taste in the final coffee brew and pre-heat the finished cup.
  5. Without removing the filter (to maintain contact integrity), dispose of pre-rinse water.
  6. Grind the pre-weighed coffee and add it to the filter.
  7. Create a small divot in the center of the grounds.
  8. Starting your pour inside the divot, use the cooled water (optimal 200 degrees) to completely saturate the grounds and allow the coffee to bloom for about 30-40 seconds.
  9. Using a continuous circular motion, slowly pour water over the grounds, using the sides of the V60 and pouring into the middle.
  10. Stop pouring the water when you’ve reached about 1 inch below the top of the finished cup and allow to continue dripping.
  11. Discard the filter/grounds and enjoy your V60 drip coffee.

For greater consistency, use a weight scale and stop pouring the water at the recommended weight for the size of your finished cup.

The whole brew time from bloom to finish should take approximately 3.5-4 minutes when done correctly.

You can substitute a metal cone filter for the paper filters, but still pre-heat the filter and finished cup.

Here’s a great video of the technique used by Matt Perger, 2012 World Brewer’s Cup Champion winner

Hario V60 Pour Over by Matt Perger from St Ali on Vimeo.

Brewing Method Pros

  • User temperature control
  • Paper filters block fats and bitters of grounds (pro & con)
  • User controlled brew time
  • No build up of rancid coffee oils
  • Simple clean up
  • Durable, ceramic body retains heat
  • Consistent taste via grinding, brewing and pouring techniques

Brewing Method Cons

  • Periodically replenish paper filter supply (unless using a metal cone)
  • Paper filters block fats and bitters of grounds that some people prefer
  • Brew and Serve vessels are separate

Brewing Method Suggested Coffees

  • Costa Rica
  • El Salvador
  • Guatemala
  • Kenya

Brewing Methods: Siphon Coffee Maker

The Siphon (or Vacuum) Coffee Maker brews by using two chambers where vapor pressure and vacuum produce the finished coffee.

madame-vassieux-vacuum-potsThe use of this brewing method can be traced back to the 1830’s where one of the first patents filed for a vacuum device was held by a German gentleman named Loeff from Berlin. Many more patents with “improvements” quickly followed, one being that of Madame Vassieux of Lyons, France in 1841 which looks markedly similar to the one which I’m currently using.

The Siphon works by heating and cooling the water gases (vapor) from the lower vessel (carafe chamber) to the upper vessel (infusion chamber) and back again as brewed coffee to the carafe chamber. During brewing, a small amount of water and vapors will remain in the carafe chamber so that the atmospheric pressure will uphold the column of water in the siphon. Once the proper brewing time has been reached (about 2 minutes for a 5 cup model), the heat is removed from the carafe chamber which relieves the pressure in the carafe chamber and allows the brewed coffee to “vacuum” back down from the infusion chamber. For a more detailed explanation of how a Siphon Coffee Maker works, check out this article on CoffeeGeek.com.

Now to the good stuff … how to use one!

Coffee-to-Water Ratio:

16:1 SCAA Standard = approximately 1oz (28g) coffee per 16oz (453g) water.
1.6 – 2.0 grams of coffee per fluid ounce of water; if you don’t have a scale, use 2 table spoons of coffee per 6 fluid ounces of water.

Directions for a 5 Cup Siphon Coffee Maker:

  1. Drop the cloth filter into the top infusion chamber with the chain hanging down into the siphon tube. Pull the chain down and hook it to the bottom of the siphon tube.
  2. Fill the lower carafe chamber to the 5 mark with hot water (closer to boiling shortens wait time).
  3. Fill 5 tablespoons of coffee (more or less to preference) into the infusion chamber (using a slightly finer grind than drip).
  4. Ignite your heat source and place directly beneath the lower carafe chamber. It should take about 4 minutes or so to boil.
  5. Once the water reaches boiling, it is siphoned through the glass tube, past the filter and into the top infusion chamber. Agitate the coffee with a back and forth motion to fully saturate the grounds.
  6. After about 2 minutes, agitate the coffee once again, then extinguish the heat source.
  7. Once the carafe chamber starts to cool, the coffee is siphoned back down into it.
  8. Gently rock the top infusion chamber back and forth until it can easily be removed (placing it in its convertible lid/stand) and serve the coffee directly from the lower carafe chamber as a decanter.

Now sit back, relax and enjoy your siphon coffee.

syphon-bellina

Brewing Method Pros

  • Reusable cloth filters
  • User temperature control
  • Evenly & fully saturated grounds
  • User controlled agitation of grounds
  • User controlled brew time
  • Visually & aromatically stimulating

Brewing Method Cons

  • Extra clean up time with flame as heat source (soot)
  • Open flame unless you buy an expensive halogen heat source
  • Glass decanter allows brew to cool quickly

Brewing Method Suggested Coffees

  • Brazil
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Ethiopia
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